Posts Tagged ‘Computerized Self Test’

Exercise for Prevention

A study calculated that an intervention that would delay the onset of AD by 12 months would lead to 9.2 million fewer cases of AD globally. Research has estimated that reducing inactivity by 10-25% could prevent between 380,000 to one million cases of AD worldwide. Based on published reports, if the cost of care for an AD patient is $10,000 more per year than a patient without AD, we would save 3.8 to 10 billion dollars a year.

 

Despite the benefits of exercise, research suggests that the subpopulation of older adults actually exercise less. In general, health-promoting behaviors tend to increase with age, with the exception of exercise. Different factors as to why this age group is more sedentary include: lack of self-efficacy, inadequate education, poor support, limited access to recommended exercise and abnormalities of mobility.

Isolation, cost, lack of socialization as well as poor physician emphasis are also factors. Exercise is a cost effective, non-pharmaceutical treatment to delaying the onset of dementia and improves outcomes. A critical challenge is how to help older adults overcome obstacles that prevent them from developing a healthy exercise habit. One major obstacle is a lack of motivation for exercise.

A growing amount of research reveals that an “enriched” environment may be crucial to improving brain health. “Enriched” simply means that influences such as physical exercise and intellectual stimulation can affect your brain’s functioning. Findings from brain health studies at UC Berkeley have corroborated the importance of exercise on brain health.

It all makes perfect sense, as the brain is a vital part of the body. Since it is comprised of cells nourished by your blood, your heart’s health also plays an important role in your brain’s wellbeing. Regular physical activity improves cerebral blood flow, which promotes better mental functioning. So, it’s easy to see why both physical and intellectual exercises would help improve brain functioning.

Alzheimer’s Research in Tennessee – Dr. John Dougherty

Medinteract’s co-founder, Dr. John Dougherty and Dr. Alan Solomon from the University of Tennessee Medical Center, discuss the exciting research collaboration with Eli Lilly and Co. and the newly FDA-approved Amyvid which is used in the early diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer’s disease.

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2012/apr/15/doctors-collaborate-on-study-of-early-alzheimers/

Sports Illustrated – Finding a Cure

Medinteract Co-founder, Dr. John Dougherty, was quoted in the article “Finding A Cure” by Alexander Wolf in the December 12, 2011 issue.

Excerpt  – “Early diagnosis is so important,” says Dr. John Dougherty, who runs the Memory Clinic at the University of Tennessee’s Cole Neuroscience Center. “The goal is prevention through delay. If we can delay symptoms by five years with medication and exercise, we can reduce the number of sufferers by six- to eight million—[about] the population of metropolitan Atlanta.”

View the full article

The cover featured: Sportsman Of The Year: Mike Krzyzewski / Sportswoman Of The Year: Pat Summitt

The two winningest coaches in Division I college basketball history (907 for him, 1,075 for her) have more in common than just extraordinary success. For reaching far beyond their campuses and refusing to be defined by their genders, SI honors them together.

Medinteract – Selected as the 2011 Technology Company of the Year

Tech 2020′s Tennessee Valley Technology Council presented its annual Navigator Awards Wednesday, November 16, during the first day of the Entrepreneurial Imperative 2011 Conference. Awards of excellence were given for this year’s top entrepreneur, researcher, and technology company, as well as for the Tech Commericalization Champion of the year.

Selected as the 2011 Technology Company of the Year, Medinteract  was cofounded by Andrew Dougherty. Medinteract provides efficient and effective detection of Alzheimer’s disease by their computer based cognitive screening testing technology. Early detection leads to early intervention delaying the impact of the disease. Medinteract is now providing their detection services to a range of medical service providers across the region.

See the full release from Tech2020’s Tennessee Valley Technology Council.

  • Blog
  • April 20th, 2010

Finding Peace of Mind Through Early Screening

A few days ago we received a very nice testimonial on our Facebook page and it made me realize that what we offer is truly two-fold.  Here is the message we received:

I took the self test today, and the results were excellent in all areas. With a family history of Alzheimer’s, having access to a quick, easy, affordable tool to catch problems early, gives me great peace of mind. Now I’ll chalk up my memory problems to overwork, rather than to early ALZ.

We offer the ALZselftest as a way to help people discover early warning signs of Alzheimer’s and get diagnosed early, when treatment options are most effective. But on the other side are the millions of baby boomers who have begun to worry that their memory lapses are something far more serious than mere absent-mindedness or paying insufficient attention. For these folks, like our commenter above, the ALZselftest offers a quick, highly accurate way to find “peace of mind”. The less time you spend fretting about the occasional lost set of keys, the more clear your mind will be, and the better you’ll feel each day.

Do not fear the outcome! Knowledge is power, and for the first time you are empowered with the tools to screen your mind and learn crucial information about your cognitive function. Besides, think how relieved you will be when you find out that you forget the same things the rest of us do, and are suffering no serious deficits within any of your cognitive domains! Don’t delay, screen your brain today.

Free Memory Testing During Alzheimer’s Awareness Garden

This week Medinteract is offering the ALZselftest free to the public as part of the 4th Annual Alzheimer’s Awareness Garden. This is part of our ongoing effort to educate the public and screen seniors for early signs of Alzheimer’s, while there’s still plenty of time to treat it.  Please join us if you are in the Knoxville area. The Memory Walk takes place Saturday, April 17th.

The Brain and Spine Institute in collaboration with the Cole Neuroscience Center will again host the 4th Annual Alzheimer’s Awareness Garden April 12-16. The Alzheimer’s Awareness Garden honors families and caregivers impacted by Alzheimer’s. This year, the garden will be located outdoors in the Healing Garden.

April 5 to 9, the week prior to opening the garden, special activities are planned in the main lobby from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. daily including the following.

  • Computerized memory testing
  • Tips for coping with caregiver stress
  • “Food for Thought”
  • Diabetes, stroke and the Alzheimer’s connection
  • Brain games and teasers
  • News
  • March 31st, 2010

Knoxville News Sentinel – Detecting Dementia

Front page article in the Knoxville News Sentinel – Test developed by UT doc and his son screens for Alzheimer’s March 31, 2010

  • News
  • March 29th, 2010

Latest News Links for Computerized Self Test

Here is the latest list of sites featuring articles on the Computerized Self Test, or, the ALZselftest.com:

On PubMed.gov

From Science Daily

New Article on Computerized Self Test from Medscape

From The Behavioral Medicine Report

From WATE.com

  • News
  • March 19th, 2010

New Online Test May Help Detect Alzheimer’s Sooner

From WATE News in Knoxville, TN.  Get the whole story here.

KNOXVILLE (WATE) – A new online test developed in Knoxville may help with earlier diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease.

An estimated 5 million people have Alzheimer’s disease and the latest studies show up to 60 percent go undiagnosed until it’s too late to do much about it.

It’s a progressive and fatal disease of the brain that destroys brain cells, causing memory loss and problems with thinking and behavior.

The simple, interactive test is posted on the Web sitealzselftest.com. It only takes 10 minutes and costs just under $20.

Your answers reveal important information about your mental functions.

The test is a sort of fitness test for the brain. It starts with questions like what year is it? What month? What week?

Then the questions progress to dig deeper into what’s going on in your brain.

At UT Medical Center’s Cole Neuroscience Center, researcher Rex Cannon, with UT Knoxville, and Dr. John Dougherty with the, UT Graduate School of Medicine, developed the test to get more people diagnosed in time to make a difference in their quality of life.

“It’s so important, if not critical, for people to come early for evaluation. That’s why we’ve been so interested in developing this test that people can access online. Or if they’re not computer literate a loved one, family member, can help them with the computer interface,” Dr. Dougherty says.

“Nobody is really afraid of the test and I think that’s important they don’t feel alienated, kind of comfortable taking it. It speaks to the patient with verbal instructions so that’s important,” Cannon says.

After you take the test, if you show early signs of Alzheimer’s disease, you can take the results to your doctor.

  • News
  • March 3rd, 2010

New Alzheimer’s Test Offers Better Opportunities for Early Detection

KNOXVILLE – Early detection is key to more effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of cognitive impairment, and new research shows that a test developed by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is more than 95 percent effective in detecting cognitive abnormalities associated with these diseases.

The test, called CST — for computerized self test – was designed to be both effective and relatively simple for medical professionals to administer and for patients to take.

Rex Cannon, an assistant professor of psychology at UT Knoxville, and Dr. John Dougherty, an associate professor in the UT Graduate School of Medicine, worked with a team of researchers to develop CST. The impetus for the test came from data showing that 60 percent of Alzheimer’s cases are not diagnosed in the primary care setting, and that those delays lead to missed treatment opportunities.

“Early detection is at the forefront of the clinical effort in Alzheimer’s research, and application of instruments like CST in the primary care setting is of extreme importance,” said Cannon.

The CST is a brief, interactive online test that works to asses various impairments in functional cognitive domains – in essence, it’s a fitness test of sorts for the basic functions of thinking and processing information that are affected by Alzheimers and milder forms of cognitive impairment.

Cannon and Dougherty’s research, published in the April issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, showed that the CST was substantially more effective and more accurate in detecting the presence of Alzheimer and other forms of cognitive impairment in patients than other existing tests. The CST had a 96 percent accuracy rate compared to 71 percent and 69 percent for the tests that are currently in use.

Part of the goal in developing the test, according to Cannon, was to ensure that the test is useful in the primary care setting, where physicians may not have detailed training in recognizing cognitive impairments, but where an early diagnosis may do the most good for patients.

“Computerized testing is a developing and exciting area for research,” said Cannon, who noted that the test can provide an objective way to determine what diseases may affect the patient and provide information to begin treatments that can blunt the effects of Alzheimer’s.

Cannon and Dougherty, who are also affiliated with the Cole Neuroscience Institute at the UT Medical Center, collaborated with Medical Interactive Education in developing the CST over the past two years.

The journal article is titled “The Computerized Self Test (CST): An Interactive, Internet Accessible Cognitive Screening Test For Dementia,” Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 20 (1) and The test can be found at www.alzselftest.com.